The Lin Fa Shan Loop

Would you want to do a challenging 17 to 18 kilometre hike or run, starting and finishing in Mui Wo? Yes – then we recommend you do the Lin Fa Shan Loop. That is if you like elevation, as it packs in a nice 1000 meters of elevation in that short distance. Be warned it is not for the fainted hearted and can be classified as a mildly hard run.

Since it is a loop you can obviously do it both ways. One way would be to start at Lantau Base Camp and go in the direction of Nam Shan following the Lantau Trail. Otherwise if you want to keep more to the trails, you can go through Mui Wo via the old Village trail heading towards Nam Shan (An example of the route is shown in the link below). From Nam Shan you follow Lantau Trail up Sunset Peak until you reach around 600m of altitude where you will see a trail to your right. Take that trail and enjoy the run over the Lin Fa Shan ridge. After gaining some altitude you will slowly lose altitude. You can see Mui Wo on your right and Tung Chung on your left. Continuing down the stairs you will reach the village of Pak Mong, your only water stop. We recommend you take a little time to find one of the tiny shops if you need water as they are a little hidden. From Pak Mong follow the Olympic Trail back to Mui Wo.

The other way would be to start at the same place and head for the Olympic Trail to make your way to Pak Mong. In any case, always good to start at Lantau Base Camp to ask for directions and to hear the latest news on the trails regarding bees, wasps, dogs and the weather. Take the opportunity too to stock up on a few gels or bars to keep you going. We also offer a bag drop service where we can keep your dry clothes and belongings whilst you’re on your run.

Here is a link to the run: Shane’s run




Trail Tip for Newer Trail Runners: The South Lantau Country Trail
Often I get asked which trails in Lantau are best for newer trail runners. In response I have suggested the South Lantau Country Trail to newer trail runners wanting a good workout. I suggest this for three main reasons:
1) There is little elevation,
2) It’s a varied terrain and
3) It’s runnable.

This trail is good to tackle when you are new to trail running since it gives you plenty of opportunity to run, while at the same time is tough and technical enough to start learning the technical tricks of trail running. In other words, long enough to feel like a good work out but short enough to not feel completely drained at the end. The views on a good day are well worth the effort. There are a few waterfalls along the way to cool off on a hot day. Just remember there is no water at the end so take enough to cover the distance and then a little more to drink at the end. From the end point (Pak Kung Au) there are buses to Tung Chung or back to Mui Wo. You can do a bag drop at Lantau Base Camp, enjoy the trail and come back to some fresh clothes and maybe some beach time. Great trail to start with to test the legs. Run Lantau!

More info here:
Enjoy Hiking South Lantau Country Trail
Sunset Peak and Nam Shanau Nam Shan Peak are the two main ranges of Lantau. The South Lantau Country Trail crosses both of them. Sunset Peak is the third highest peak of Hong Kong. On a grassy glade adjacent to Yi Tung Shan, there are 20 granite chalets rustic in appearance.
Lantau Peak is Hong Kong’s second highest peak. Standing 934m, rugged and rocky, it was named the Broken Skull by villagers. When the British first visited the island, they asked the locals for the peak’s name. They were told Lantau, which is the phonetic expression of Broken Skull in Cantonese. Somehow the name stuck.
Beyond the Nam Shan Management Centre, the trail skirts along the mid slopes of Sunset Peak. Exiting through Pak Kung Au, it joins Lantau Trail that leads to Lantau Peak and Ngong Ping. Pak Kung Au is a communication stronghold that links up south and north Lantau.
The trail crosses Tung Chung Road and trends down the southeastern face of Lantau Peak along the Tong Fuk Catchwater. This section overlooks the picturesque Cheng Sha Beach and Tong Fuk Village, and the Cha Kwo Chau, Shek Ku Chau and Soko Islands offshore.
HIKING.GOV.HK

 

Fun Beginner Trail for a Summer Day in Mui Wo
1. Drop Bag at LBC before the run with post run clothes and/or swimwear. Assuming you arrive with the ferry, it’s a 2 minute walk to Lantau Base Camp.
2. Run/Fast Hike the 11k route we’ve linked here. Has beautiful views, good trails for starting out. There is one big hill in this run, for the rest it is pretty regular but nice running. Views can be stunning, bring your sunglasses. In May, June and July be aware along the coastal trail though, there can be bees or wasps.
3. Post Run: Pick up bag at LBC and head off to Silver Mine Bay Beach. Can shower, swim, and do a bit of beach yoga. Obviously also the best time to take your recovery drink. Try Generation UCAN with protein for instance, available at LBC.
4. Head over to one of Mui Wo’s tasty restaurants for a post run meal. Nepalese, Seafood, Thai, Mexican, Turkish, The Kitchen, China Bear etc…



Lantau Trail Recommendations: Training run / Fast Hike
South East Lantau is a great area, far away from civilisation with beautiful views on a nice day. This is one of my favourite trails to go train here on Lantau. You can start in Tai O or at the bus stop where Sham Wat Road meets Keng Shan Road. In both cases, there are no water stops or options for refill, so make sure to bring enough to get through the whole 20 kilometres.

Here is the Strava link to the course, which is from the Tai O direction.

The popular ‘Coastal Trail’ to Chi Ma Wan
The coastal trail to Chi Ma Wan is very popular, as it is easy to find, not very hilly, and sports great views over the sea. To find the start of the Coastal Trail, take a left from the ferry. You could just head along China Bear and go straight over the parking lots, and follow the road around the apartment block around the corner (refer to the the black line route shown on the map below). Otherwise drop by to Lantau Base Camp to say hi and I can give you some more handy tips to keep you well informed for the run (refer to the red line route shown on the map below). From Lantau Base Camp you can cross the road, take the footpath behind the church, take a left on the parking lot and you are at the same spot.

Following the road you’ll see some construction activity both on the left and right side, but keep a close eye on the right side of the road and you will see the entrance to the trail, marked by the yellow sign of Lantau Trail. As with most trails in Hong Kong, it starts with plenty of concrete steps! Although the first part of the trail is concrete, don’t be perturbed for after a while it will change into a more natural trail with fewer concrete surface to keep the trail together. The trail is mildly undulating so be sure to take in the scenery and enjoy the vistas over the sea towards Hong Kong island. On good days you can see all the way to Hei Ling Chau.
After a while, on top of a climb, you will come to a more open area where the trail splits. Here you could go right, up some steps following the Lantau Trail section 12, but if your plan remains that you want to do the coastal trail towards Chi Ma Wan, you need to continue straight and down the hill. From here and on the trail is simple to follow, soon you will see the sea again on your left hand side, and all you need to do is stay on the trails that hug the coast, don’t take any right turn. Most of the trail is concrete but some parts are more challenging.

When taking this trail to Chi Ma Wan please be aware of the following points:
1. There are regularly bee/wasp nests along the trail. Especially in May, June and July, since it is building season for them and they tend to be aggressive. Keep your eyes and ears out for their activity, and if anything, run!
2. Mountain bikers use this trail to access Chi Ma Wan. Please look out for them to avoid a collision.
3. The buffalo have moved to a spot at the bottom of the cemetery steps and are frequently on the trail. You may come around a corner and find yourself face to face with one. Pay attention on the corners. Especially true at night as they often graze along the trail.

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The Lin Fa Shan Loop

Would you want to do a challenging 17to18 kilometre hike orrun, starting and finishing in Mui Wo? Yes – then we recommend you do the Lin Fa Shan Loop. That is if you like elevation, as it packs in a nice 1000 meters of elevation in that short distance. Be warned it is not for the fainted hearted and can be classified as a mildly hard run.

Since it is a loop you can obviously do it both ways. One way would be to start at Lantau Base Camp and go in the direction of Nam Shan following the Lantau Trail. Otherwise if you want to keep more to the trails, you can go through Mui Wo via the old Village trail heading towards Nam Shan (An example of the route is shown in the link below). From Nam Shan you follow Lantau Trail up Sunset Peak until you reach around 600m of altitude where you will see a trail to your right. Take that trail and enjoy the run over the Lin Fa Shan ridge. After gaining some altitude you will slowly lose altitude. You can see Mui Wo on your right and Tung Chung on your left. Continuing down the stairs you will reach the village of Pak Mong, your only water stop. We recommend you take a little time to find one of the tiny shops if you need water as they are a little hidden. From Pak Mong follow the Olympic Trail back to Mui Wo.

The other way would be to start at the same place and head for the Olympic Trail to make your way to Pak Mong. In any case, always good to start at Lantau Base Camp to ask for directions and to hear the latest news on the trails regarding bees, wasps, dogs and the weather. Take the opportunity too to stock up on a few gels or bars to keep you going. We also offer a bag drop service where we can keep your dry clothes and belongings whilst you’re on your run.

Here is a link to the run: Shane’s run




Trail Tip for Newer Trail Runners: The South Lantau Country Trail
Often I get asked which trails in Lantau are best for newer trail runners. In response I have suggested the South Lantau Country Trail to newer trail runners wanting a good workout. I suggest this for three main reasons:
1) There is little elevation,
2) It’s a varied terrain and
3) It’s runnable.

This trail is good to tackle when you are new to trail running since it gives you plenty of opportunity to run, while at the same time is tough and technical enough to start learning the technical tricks of trail running. In other words, long enough to feel like a good work out but short enough to not feel completely drained at the end. The views on a good day are well worth the effort. There are a few waterfalls along the way to cool off on a hot day. Just remember there is no water at the end so take enough to cover the distance and then a little more to drink at the end. From the end point (Pak Kung Au) there are buses to Tung Chung or back to Mui Wo. You can do a bag drop at Lantau Base Camp, enjoy the trail and come back to some fresh clothes and maybe some beach time. Great trail to start with to test the legs. Run Lantau!

More info here:
Enjoy Hiking South Lantau Country Trail
Sunset Peak and Nam Shanau Nam Shan Peak are the two main ranges of Lantau. The South Lantau Country Trail crosses both of them. Sunset Peak is the third highest peak of Hong Kong. On a grassy glade adjacent to Yi Tung Shan, there are 20 granite chalets rustic in appearance.
Lantau Peak is Hong Kong’s second highest peak. Standing 934m, rugged and rocky, it was named the Broken Skull by villagers. When the British first visited the island, they asked the locals for the peak’s name. They were told Lantau, which is the phonetic expression of Broken Skull in Cantonese. Somehow the name stuck.
Beyond the Nam Shan Management Centre, the trail skirts along the mid slopes of Sunset Peak. Exiting through Pak Kung Au, it joins Lantau Trail that leads to Lantau Peak and Ngong Ping. Pak Kung Au is a communication stronghold that links up south and north Lantau.
The trail crosses Tung Chung Road and trends down the southeastern face of Lantau Peak along the Tong Fuk Catchwater. This section overlooks the picturesque Cheng Sha Beach and Tong Fuk Village, and the Cha Kwo Chau, Shek Ku Chau and Soko Islands offshore.
HIKING.GOV.HK



Fun Beginner Trail for a Summer Day in Mui Wo
1. Drop Bag at LBC before the run with post run clothes and/or swimwear. Assuming you arrive with the ferry, it’s a 2 minute walk to Lantau Base Camp.
2. Run/Fast Hike the 11k route we’ve linked here. Has beautiful views, good trails for starting out. There is one big hill in this run, for the rest it is pretty regular but nice running. Views can be stunning, bring your sunglasses. In May, June and July be aware along the coastal trail though, there can be bees or wasps.
3. Post Run: Pick up bag at LBC and head off to Silver Mine Bay Beach. Can shower, swim, and do a bit of beach yoga. Obviously also the best time to take your recovery drink. Try Generation UCAN with protein for instance, available at LBC.
4. Head over to one of Mui Wo’s tasty restaurants for a post run meal. Nepalese, Seafood, Thai, Mexican, Turkish, The Kitchen, China Bear etc…



Lantau Trail Recommendations: Training run / Fast Hike
South East Lantau is a great area, far away from civilisation with beautiful views on a nice day.This is one of my favourite trails to go train here on Lantau. You can start in Tai O or at the bus stop where Sham Wat Road meets Keng Shan Road. In both cases, there are no water stops or options for refill, so make sure to bring enough to get through the whole 20 kilometres.

Here is the Strava link to the course, which is from the Tai O direction.

The popular ‘Coastal Trail’ to Chi Ma Wan
The coastal trail to Chi Ma Wan is very popular, as it is easy to find, not very hilly, and sports great views over the sea. To find the start of the Coastal Trail, take a left from the ferry. You could just head along China Bear and go straight over the parking lots, and follow the road around the apartment block around the corner (refer to the the black line route shown on the map below). Otherwise drop by to Lantau Base Camp to say hi and I can give you some more handy tips to keep you well informed for the run (refer to the red line route shown on the map below). From Lantau Base Camp you can cross the road, take the footpath behind the church, take a left on the parking lot and you are at the same spot.

Following the road you’ll see some construction activity both on the left and right side, but keep a close eye on the right side of the road and you will see the entrance to the trail, marked by the yellow sign of Lantau Trail. As with most trails in Hong Kong, it starts with plenty of concrete steps! Although the first part of the trail is concrete, don’t be perturbed for after a while it will change into a more natural trail with fewer concrete surface to keep the trail together. The trail is mildly undulating so be sure to take in the scenery and enjoy the vistas over the sea towards Hong Kong island. On good days you can see all the way to Hei Ling Chau.
After a while, on top of a climb, you will come to a more open area where the trail splits. Here you could go right, up some steps following the Lantau Trail section 12, but if your plan remains that you want to do the coastal trail towards Chi Ma Wan, you need to continue straight and down the hill. From here and on the trail is simple to follow, soon you will see the sea again on your left hand side, and all you need to do is stay on the trails that hug the coast, don’t take any right turn. Most of the trail is concrete but some parts are more challenging.

When taking this trail to Chi Ma Wan please be aware of the following points:
1. There are regularly bee/wasp nests along the trail. Especially in May, June and July, since it is building season for them and they tend to be aggressive. Keep your eyes and ears out for their activity, and if anything, run!
2. Mountain bikers use this trail to access Chi Ma Wan. Please look out for them to avoid a collision.
3. The buffalo have moved to a spot at the bottom of the cemetery steps and are frequently on the trail. You may come around a corner and find yourself face to face with one. Pay attention on the corners. Especially true at night as they often graze along the trail.

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